By Michael Messina

Hundreds of American workers were recently laid off at Nabisco’s Southwest Side plant in Chicago; 600 to be exact. Those workers were paid a living wage, $25-$26 an hour, and thrived as a part of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers union. Now those jobs are headed to Mexico in an attempt to cut costs via cheap, outsourced labor.

The details are laid out in an article by Labor Press:

… Mondelēz, Nabisco’s parent company, laid off 600 workers—half the plant’s staff—as part of a plan to shift production to Mexico. Bakery-floor workers in Chicago could make $25-26 an hour, Jackson says. Mondelēz did not answer questions about how much workers in its Mexican plants make, but the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, whose Local 300 represents the Chicago workers, believes it’s about $60 a week.

Since then, Jackson has joined the Nabisco 600 National Consumer Education tour, a campaign organized by the BCTGM to advocate a boycott of Nabisco products made in Mexico, to put pressure on Mondelēz to bring the jobs back to Chicago.

Here at Labor 411 it is our job to advocate for goods and services provided by companies that treat their workers well. If you are buying Nabisco products, please be sure and check where that product is coming from.

There are two ways to check:

1. Look for the “Made in Mexico” writing on the package. It will be above the Mondelēz logo.

2. Look for the two-letter code in the date stamp. MM or MS means it’s made in Mexico.

Read the full story at Labor Press here.

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Comments   

0 #2 bob 2016-07-11 13:38
Why doesn't our government make it practical to keep and (this is crazy I know) bring corporations to our great country? Lower corporate taxes to competitive worldwide levels.
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0 #1 Lawrence Johnson 2016-07-07 13:00
I don't buy anything made from Nabisco , case closed. I know that some of their products are still made in America , but too bad as I am not going to spend time reading labels .
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